Research Core Laboratories (RCL)

Seminars in Structural Biochemistry

    Promoting Interdisciplinary Research

    This seminar series is designed to provide practical knowledge of the powerful technologies and applications that are available through the biochemistry core facilities. Projects rooted in cell biology and genetics, for example, can often benefit from a characterization of the structural and mechanistic properties of the underlying macromolecules. The advanced technologies covered in this seminar series are routinely applied to mainstream scientific projects by biomedical scientists from all training backgrounds.

    Seminar Schedule (Recorded for future viewing; see below.)
    Technology
    Date
    Time Location
    Analytical Ultracentrifugation

    Wed., May 12

    12:00 -1:00 PM

    Med. 209L
    Biomolecular NMR

    Wed., May 19

    12:00 -1:00 PM

    Med. 209L
    X-Ray Crystallography

    Wed., June 2

    12:00 -1:00 PM

    Med. 209L
    Surface Plasmon Resonance Wed., June 9

    12:00 -1:00 PM

    Med. 209L

    Example Applications

  • Fundamental mechanistic relationships to understand molecular function and mode of action.
  • Mapping of binding surfaces of macromolecular complexes
  • High-resolution modeling of 3-D structure
  • Analyte and ligand association and dissociation
  • Equilibrium constants and dissociation constants
  • Steps and intermediates in the assembly of a macromolecular complex
  • Conformational changes associated with ligand binding
  • Accurate partial concentrations for multiple components present in a mixture
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    Analytical Ultracentrifugation, Wednesday May 12, 12:00 noon, 209L

    Seminar: Macromolecular Characterization in the Solution Environment with Analytical Ultracentrifugation.
    Speaker:

    Borries Demeler, Ph.D.

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Co-director,

    Center for Macromolecular Interactions (CMMI) core facility

    Recorded Seminar Mediasite Presentation
    Abstract:

    Analytical Ultracentrifugation (AUC) is the long-accepted gold standard technique for measuring biological macromolecules in a physiological solution environment. First-principle methods allow us to determine oligomerization states, equilibrium constants, kinetic rate constants, protein composition and purity, detect aggregates and to identify conformational changes.  High-resolution modeling of experimental data produces molecular mass, sedimentation, diffusion and frictional coefficients, and allows us to define accurate partial concentrations for multiple components present in a mixture. New detector technology is adding information useful for the characterization of hetero-associating systems, and allows us to trace molecules at picomolar concentration in unpurified cell extracts. Bead modeling allows us to predict anticipated hydrodynamic properties from structural data and compare and validate information obtained from complementary techniques. In this talk I will present an overview of the capabilities and applications of AUC, and present example of how this technology can be applied to biological and synthetic systems.

     

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    Biomolecular NMR, Wednesday May 19, 12:00 noon, 209L

    Seminar: UTHSCSA Biomolecular NMR Core ... more than just structure
    Speaker:

    Andrew Hinck, Ph.D.

    Professor of Biochemistry

    Director of the Biomolecular NMR Core Laboratory

    Recorded Seminar Mediasite Presentation
    Abstract:

    This lecture will provide a description of the basic NMR phenomenom and the kinds of information that can routinely derived from studies of biomolecules up to about 50 kDa in size, including information about molecular dynamics and interaction surfaces.  The lecture will also include a practical component, describing the specific steps to be taken to prepare biomolecules for NMR and how to access the UTHSCSA Biomolecular NMR Core.

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    X-ray Crystallography, Wednesday June 2, 12:00 noon, 209L

    Seminar: X-ray Crysallography Core Lab: Determining Macromolecular Structure and Function
    Speaker:

    P. John Hart, Ph.D.

    Professor of Biochemistry

    Director, X-ray Chrystallography Core Laboratory

    Recorded Seminar Mediasite Presentation
    Abstract:

     

     

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    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), Wednesday June 9, 12:00 noon, 209L

    Seminar: The use of Surface Plasmon Resonance (Biacore) for the Quantitative Characterization of Biomolecular Interactions
    Speaker:

    Eileen Lafer, Ph.D.

    Professor of Biochemistry and Co-director

    Center for Macromolecular Interactions

    Recorded Seminar Mediasite Presentation
    Abstract:

     

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    Lunch and refreshments served.